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GCSE Science: Triple Award

Awarding body : AQA

Overview of Course

If you choose to study triple sciences at GCSE, you will finish Key Stage 4 with three separate GCSEs in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. You will cover all of the same content as the GCSE Combined Science: Trilogy course, while also learning about more high level material, which may be extremely useful to you if you are planning on continuing to study A-level sciences. You will also develop practical and investigative skills, which will be assessed within the exams. This course is designed for students with a longstanding interest in all the Sciences, and have achieved highly in Science in the past. It is possible for students to study a tier that best suits their ability, although the demands of the course attract only the more able science students and hence higher tier (Grades 4 -9) will be expected.

Content and Assessment

GCSE Biology Assessment: Two written examinations (both 50% and 1 hour and 45 mins) at the end of Year 11 Content: –

  • Cell biology
  • Organisation
  • Infection and response
  • Homeostasis
  • Inheritance Ecology

GCSE Chemistry Assessment: Two written examinations (both 50% and 1 hour and 45 mins) at the end of Year 11 Content: –

  • Atomic structure and periodic table
  • Bonding, structure and properties of matter
  • Quantitative chemistry
  • Chemical changes
  • Energy changes
  • Rates and extents of chemical change
  • Organic chemistry
  • Chemical analysis
  • Chemistry of atmosphere

GCSE Physics Assessment: Two written examinations (both 50% and 1 hour and 45 mins) at the end of Year 11 Content: –

  • Forces
  • Energy
  • Waves
  • Electricity
  • Magnetism and electromagnetism
  • Particle model of matter
  • Atomic structure
  • Space physics

Career Links

Triple Science is highly recommended for those students intending on continuing to A-levels in Physics, Chemistry or Biology, and the skills you will develop in planning, in carrying out experiments and in working independently will also be very useful in any career in engineering. Students studying GCSE Biology go on to work in sectors such as microbiology and bioengineering, human and veterinary medicine, sport science and environmental science. Students studying GCSE Chemistry may go on to chemical engineering, industrial chemistry, geology and volcanology or forensic science. Students studying GCSE Physics may advance to mechanical or aerospace engineering, astrophysics, electrical engineering or electrical resource engineering.